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BigJimny Meet 2019 (17 May 2019)

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Running in the Engine - Engineering explained.

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08 May 2019 16:10 #207538 by Andy2640
But not by me ;-) .........


Ok, Gen 4 manual says:

*The future performance and reliability of the engine depends on the care and restraint exercised during its early life. It is especially important to observe the following precautions during its first 600 miles.

* After starting, do not race the engine, wait until warmed up

* Avoid prolonged vehicle operations at a constant speed . Moving parts will break in better if you are vary your speed.

* Start off from a stop slowly, avoid full throttle starts.

* Avoid hard breaking, especially during the first 200 miles.

* Do not drive slowly in a high gear.

*Drive the vehicle at moderate engine speeds.

* Do not tow a trailer fopr the foirst 600 miles.


So, some of these are obvious, like brakes being worn in, and waiting for the engine to warm. However.....

I would love to know whats actually happening during the first 600 miles. Or not happening if the engine is stressed. Anyone wanna make this super clear and preferably detailed for monkey boys like myself.

It has preoccupied a lot of my driving time, wondering what is going on under that hood with the engine and transmission. And at what point do we start incrementally increasing revs etc, and by how much etc etc...... ?


Super - mega detail welcomed. Guess work will also be happily tolerated ;-)


Andy.

A wise man once said...... When we are Mean, Shout at People, Lose our Tempers, Swear, and generally act like Tool Bags, Never forget ..... We are all Cavemen in Suits, Uniforms and/or Overalls ..... Living in Semi-Concrete Jungles. Andy - 2019 AD.

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08 May 2019 16:26 #207539 by Gadget
All the different parts of the engine will differ in size by a tiny amount from car to car, due to the limitations of the manufacturing process. When the engine is new, all those parts have to be worn slightly so that they fit perfectly together. There will be microscopic bits of metal being worn off the inside of the engine as pistons and camshaft and valves all do their complicated stuff.

If you just rag a brand new engine, there's a chance that a couple of those bits might decide not to play nicely and jam or knock bigger chunks off each other, so it's better to take things easy to allow for gradual wear.

It's not such a big deal these days are manufacturing tolerances are far tighter, but still well worth it.
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09 May 2019 05:55 #207567 by Andy2640
Nice1 Gadget, that's interesting stuff.

So, when would you start introducing higher revs then mate? After say 600 miles or...? and finally (sorry, i ask far too many questions) at what point will you hammer it ;-)

A wise man once said...... When we are Mean, Shout at People, Lose our Tempers, Swear, and generally act like Tool Bags, Never forget ..... We are all Cavemen in Suits, Uniforms and/or Overalls ..... Living in Semi-Concrete Jungles. Andy - 2019 AD.

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09 May 2019 06:56 #207568 by Lambert
The longer you are able to be gentle with it the better, to a point. Dreadnaught had 18k of oap miles under her belt when I took her on and it showed. She was unable to rev cleanly and was generally very tight. But equally everything was nicely bedded in when the abuse started. I personally think that the first year or service which ever is first is a good length of time for being at least vaguely careful. After that crack on.

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09 May 2019 07:25 #207570 by AlexK
Had a conversation with a test engineer for a performance brand about this a few years back. His opinion was that babying a vehicle can do just as much damage as thrashing it. He swore that vehicles he'd driven hard but respectfully* from new had measurably better performance in later life.

*Respectfully means letting everything get up to temperature.

With any 4x4 vehicle, the worst thing you can do is drive at a constant speed on the motorway for ages. That creates an uneven wear pattern in the ring & pinion sets. Varying your speed avoids this.
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09 May 2019 10:08 #207574 by Velocette
Everything that has been said is the way to do it,,plus the need for an early oil/filter change at 500/600 miles to be sure that all the initial running in rubbish is removed and you have a clean engine to progressively bed in.
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09 May 2019 10:16 #207575 by Andy2640

AlexK wrote: Had a conversation with a test engineer for a performance brand about this a few years back. His opinion was that babying a vehicle can do just as much damage as thrashing it. He swore that vehicles he'd driven hard but respectfully* from new had measurably better performance in later life.

*Respectfully means letting everything get up to temperature.

With any 4x4 vehicle, the worst thing you can do is drive at a constant speed on the motorway for ages. That creates an uneven wear pattern in the ring & pinion sets. Varying your speed avoids this.


Thanks you 2. Now........ that is interesting! Conflicting advice always intrigues me. Decisions decisions. To give it some, or not to give it some, now that is the question. Mmmhhhhh???

A wise man once said...... When we are Mean, Shout at People, Lose our Tempers, Swear, and generally act like Tool Bags, Never forget ..... We are all Cavemen in Suits, Uniforms and/or Overalls ..... Living in Semi-Concrete Jungles. Andy - 2019 AD.

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09 May 2019 10:31 #207577 by Lambert
The only thing I would say it that a test engineer giving advice while insightful has to be tempered by the fact that such experiences are usually conducted on someone else's equipment so when it dies a premature death it's at someone else's expense. I'm not saying it's bad advice but would they treat their own car like that or would it get more than a little bit of compassion?

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09 May 2019 10:49 #207579 by AlexK

Lambert wrote: would they treat their own car like that


Yes, but to be clear neither he nor I are advocating thrashing anything. We're both strong advocates for the concept of mechanical sympathy. His perspective was that pootling about everywhere like an old lady with blue hair leads to a vehicle with stunted performance.
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09 May 2019 11:07 - 09 May 2019 11:07 #207585 by Lambert
Which is exactly what I had when I took on Dreadnaught, wouldn't rev cleanly or much past 3500 rpm and had a flat spot at 2000 rpm. A few months of Italian tune ups later and it was sorted. But equally I do not think she would still be here had the Italian tune ups being conducted from new. All things in moderation.

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09 May 2019 11:18 #207586 by Bill Portland

Lambert wrote: All things in moderation.


Got it in one!
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09 May 2019 11:48 #207588 by G-imny
Andy, others have covered the reasons better than I can so I thought I would just mention what I have done with my gen4.

I basically drove it gently for the first 1200 miles not really exceeding 4000 rpm. Between 1200 and 2500 miles I gradually started accelerating a little harder and taking the revs higher though not sustaining high revs for any length of time. All through that period the engine has felt very tight. I am now at 3200 miles and the engine is feeling a lot better, free reving and sounds less harsh.
So I now drive it basically ‘normally’.
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