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Bolt anti-sieze preventive chemical

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20 Jul 2018 06:48 #194491 by Bosanek
I want to disassemble some of the suspension and drivetrain componentes of the Jimny in order to better rustproof the underbody of the car (better access) and also to rustproof some of the suspension components too (panhard rods, etc.).

The car is relatively young (5 years old) and is just staring to rust. Now it's the time to clean it and protect it. The bolts should not be seized on such a young car.


So now is the chance to apply some anti seize compound to the bolts while they are dismounted anyway. The goal is to maximize the chances to be able to remove the bolts again if a need arises in the future (for example having to change a radius arm bush).

However, applying a wrong anti-seize compound to a bolt can have severe negative consequences.
The first risk is overtightening the bolt because a lubricated bolt gives less resistance when torquing, thus invalidating the setting on the torque wrench.
The second risk is that the bolt might come loose later on due to vibrations because the anti seize actually loosened its grip on the tread ....


So what are the others' experiences on this matter?



On my previous Jimny, when I was installing underbody protectors (radius arms etc.) I removed the bolts easily although the vehicle was 10 years old at the time. I reinstalled the bolts back after fitting the protectors, and I did not apply any anti seize compound to the bolts.
However, only two years after that refitting, all those same bolts we thoroughly seized and I could not remove any of them!

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20 Jul 2018 07:08 #194493 by sniper
I've stripped machines, rebuilt them and gone back years later to rebuild again. Every nut and bolt would be treated to some copperslip and give no trouble at all.

Use copper based assembly compound, there will be no negative impact on torque settings.

On extended studs, we used to protect threads with a coating of copperslip, dust would settle on the grease but years later they'd wipe off like new.

Thats what I'll be doing whilst on the same job as you.

sniper

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20 Jul 2018 09:02 - 20 Jul 2018 09:03 #194497 by Scimike
As said above, you cant go wrong with copper grease ^^^^^
I have also used chassis wax (waxoyl etc) when assembling and this works, but not for any components that get hot.
Last edit: 20 Jul 2018 09:03 by Scimike.

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20 Jul 2018 18:41 #194510 by helijohn

Scimike wrote: As said above, you cant go wrong with copper grease ^^^^^.

Me too.

Do it right - use Hammerite
When the blue light is flashing I am kidding.

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23 Jul 2018 12:26 #194565 by Bosanek
Thank you for the opinions. So it's essentially a copper grease?

Does anyone know of an example product (for example from Loctite, Liqui Moly, Wurth, etc.)?

So just apply a light coating of copper grease on every bolt tread and just torque the bolts according to factory torque values?

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23 Jul 2018 13:17 #194570 by facade

Bosanek wrote: Thank you for the opinions. So it's essentially a copper grease?


Copperslip if you can't be bothered with these fancy new ones and only have the one tin that you bought in 1978 (but don't use with stainless bolts)
nickelslip if there is stainless
Aluminium anti-seize (from bicycle shops) for bolts screwed into alloy.

Ceramic anti-seize if there is a mix of metals and high temperature.

Molyslip make all of them, Rocol do a range, no doubt the hobby market package in small tubes for shops.

I use the tin of copperslip (Silkolene I think) I bought in 1978, or some loctite branded aluminium anti-seize for everything...

If it suddenly breaks, go back to the last thing that you did before it broke and start looking there :)

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