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× An area for non Suzuki Jimny related chat. Keep it clean etc. as this is a public forum with young readers.

Speed or not to Speed - that is the question !

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15 Feb 2017 15:58 #178025 by Zee Zee Top
Recently a friend of mine got done for being over the drink drive limit. It was his own fault and knew he should not have driven, but that's another story. Whilst discussing this we drifted onto the topic of speeding. Now I am no expert and don't know the exact criteria for the following, but it got us thinking. If I am not mistaken (and I might be) if you are caught speeding a few mph over the limit and it falls within the "offence" range then you get points and a fine. If at a higher speed there is the chance that you may be offered a driving course and keep a clean licence. After the course you should be a better driver. So my question is this, get caught a little over the limit and get points or drive faster and keep a clean licence?
(This if course does not include any insurance issues).

Having a girlie moment

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15 Feb 2017 16:26 #178026 by Halford
you've got it the wrong way around

a little over the limit = option to pay and attend a retraining/awareness course with no points and no record
a bit more over the limit, then fine and points

I was done at 35mph in a 30 mph a few years back and did the course - took a day and cost me £80 I think - there were about 15 people on the course (runs 5 days a week) and it was run by the AA - good little earner like most of these things.

;)

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15 Feb 2017 16:51 #178027 by Keithy
Did the course in 2014.....in future I'll take the points.....easier on the brain!

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15 Feb 2017 17:09 - 15 Feb 2017 17:14 #178029 by jackonlyjack
From April 24th this year, speeding fines are set to dramatically rise in an attempt to deter motorists from driving dangerously.

Following on from tougher punishments on drivers who use mobile phones while driving, magistrates will now punish drivers according to harsher guidelines if they’re caught above the limit.

Here’s all you need to know about the change in speeding fine sentences and how it will affect you if you’re caught.

What’s changed?


As part of the changes, magistrates are now being instructed to be much tougher on those who commit the most serious speeding offences.

The new fine structure is ranked into three alphabetically categorised bands, with the least severe being Band A, while the most severe is Band C.

Band C fines are reserved for speeders who commit serious offences, and Band C fines carry an absolute minimum fine of 150 per cent of the offender’s weekly income.

What exactly is a ‘serious’ offence?
It depends on the speed limit, but it’s understood to be an offence where the driver is driving excessively faster than the posted speed limit. In a 30mph zone, that means travelling 51mph or above, while in a 70mph you’d need to be travelling at least 101mph for a Band C fine.

For a full breakdown of the speed limits and the different fine bands, refer to the information from the Sentencing Council for England and Wales in the image below:




How much do I have to pay if I’m caught?
Given that the fines are calculated according to how much the offender earns, it varies. Band A fines start from 50 per cent of an offender’s weekly income, while Band B fines start from 100 per cent. The most severe Band C fines have a minimum penalty of 150 per cent of the driver’s weekly income.

So, as an example, if you earn £25,000 a year then the absolute minimum that a Band C fine will cost you is £720.

This will increase or decrease depending on what your salary is, but magistrates are instructed to cap fines at a maximum of £1,000 or £2,500 if the driver happens to be caught excessively speeding on the motorway.

As a result, anyone earning more than approximately £47,000 probably won’t have to pay more than the maximum, leading some to claim that the sentencing changes will disproportionately punish drivers on lower incomes.

Is there any wiggle room in how much I’m fined?


Yes there is, but it works both ways. A magistrate can decrease your fine due to mitigating factors, but on the other hand they can choose to increase it based on other factors.

For example, a magistrate could choose to charge a driver more than the mandatory amount if they display a history of previous driving convictions, or if they’ve been caught speeding while on bail.

On the other hand, mitigating circumstances like a clean criminal record or proof that the driver was in a genuine emergency will be taken into account, and the magistrates could choose to be much more lenient.

Magistrates could also in certain circumstances choose to reduce the fine if the defendant is seen to be cooperating with the authorities or pleading guilty to the offence.

Are fines the only punishments speeders can get?
Depending on the severity of the offence, a magistrate could also choose to discipline drivers in other ways as well as fining them. Speeding drivers could be disqualified from driving either temporarily or permanently, while they can also choose to add points to your driving licence.

However, for less severe offences drivers with clean licences can still opt to attend a speed awareness course in order to avoid penalty points.
Attachments:
Last edit: 15 Feb 2017 17:14 by jackonlyjack.

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15 Feb 2017 17:19 #178030 by 1066Boy
I also did the course about 3 years ago. I opted for a Saturday so not to take any time off.
It was a group of about 25 people, all caught in different places all over Sussex on different days.
All of us were caught with handheld lazer speed guns and without exception, all at 36mph. :unsure:
No 35's or 37+ mph just 36 ! we all said it was a bit fishy. :angry:

Jimny JLX Facelift model 2005.
Kashmir Blue Pearl Metallic.
2" lift with Procomp Es1000 shocks.
Diff and transfer box guards from Jimnybits.
215/75/15 General Grabber x3's
and a driver called Allan (1066Boy)

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15 Feb 2017 17:49 #178034 by Halford
so how much do the scum that don't have licenses, insurance or jobs get fined ?

that''s about 10% of the cars around here and at least when we had tax discs they were easier to spot

oh well, ranting again

ps was thinking of making some doughnut and greggs pastie style mobile phone cases so that all the drivers around here wouldn't stand out when using their phones when driving

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16 Feb 2017 05:56 #178048 by Lambert
All the above being said, does the 10%+2mph thing still have weight? I know that switching to the new tyres has brought up my gps speed in relation to the speedo so I am now within 2mph instead of the previous 4 with the Bridgestone thus reducing the margin for error.

It's not a Jimny. It's my Jimny

Mooo said Ermintrude (black)
Boing said Zebedee (blue automatic)
Hello said Florence (silver gv 2.4)

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16 Feb 2017 07:07 #178051 by 1066Boy
We covered that on the course. Its down to the police in that particular county. They have the digression, can nick you for 31mph in a 30 if they want too. :(

Jimny JLX Facelift model 2005.
Kashmir Blue Pearl Metallic.
2" lift with Procomp Es1000 shocks.
Diff and transfer box guards from Jimnybits.
215/75/15 General Grabber x3's
and a driver called Allan (1066Boy)

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16 Feb 2017 14:56 #178068 by Zee Zee Top
That's interesting Halford, that we got it the wrong way round but it does not make much sense to me.
So if you are a little over the limit you may get a chance of a safety course, but if going faster and probably a greater risk, you don't get the chance of a course. Seems a bit counter-productive to me for road safety.

Having a girlie moment

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16 Feb 2017 16:48 #178077 by 1066Boy
I think that they do take the risk in the area into account. Over the limit in a built up area you will get pulled, sit on the motorway if its free flowing at 80mph and its unlikely you will be bothered. :)

Jimny JLX Facelift model 2005.
Kashmir Blue Pearl Metallic.
2" lift with Procomp Es1000 shocks.
Diff and transfer box guards from Jimnybits.
215/75/15 General Grabber x3's
and a driver called Allan (1066Boy)

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23 Feb 2017 19:52 #178441 by helijohn

Halford wrote: I was done at 35mph in a 30 mph a few years back and did the course - took a day and cost me £80 I think -

;)

I loved mine cos it gave me a chance to argue; against speed limits and against criminalising the motorist, against stupid regulations. against ridiculous speed limits, against traffic calming, jaywalkers, bus lanes, roadworks, almost every annoying driving thing and the nanny state. Got a lot off me chest that day.
You are a criminal as soon as you get behind the wheel.

Do it right - use Hammerite
When the blue light is flashing I am kidding.

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23 Feb 2017 21:56 #178447 by Young Pretender

jackonlyjack wrote: From April 24th this year, speeding fines are set to dramatically rise in an attempt to deter motorists from driving dangerously.

Following on from tougher punishments on drivers who use mobile phones while driving, magistrates will now punish drivers according to harsher guidelines if they’re caught above the limit.

Here’s all you need to know about the change in speeding fine sentences and how it will affect you if you’re caught.

What’s changed?


As part of the changes, magistrates are now being instructed to be much tougher on those who commit the most serious speeding offences.

The new fine structure is ranked into three alphabetically categorised bands, with the least severe being Band A, while the most severe is Band C.

Band C fines are reserved for speeders who commit serious offences, and Band C fines carry an absolute minimum fine of 150 per cent of the offender’s weekly income.

What exactly is a ‘serious’ offence?
It depends on the speed limit, but it’s understood to be an offence where the driver is driving excessively faster than the posted speed limit. In a 30mph zone, that means travelling 51mph or above, while in a 70mph you’d need to be travelling at least 101mph for a Band C fine.

For a full breakdown of the speed limits and the different fine bands, refer to the information from the Sentencing Council for England and Wales in the image below:




How much do I have to pay if I’m caught?
Given that the fines are calculated according to how much the offender earns, it varies. Band A fines start from 50 per cent of an offender’s weekly income, while Band B fines start from 100 per cent. The most severe Band C fines have a minimum penalty of 150 per cent of the driver’s weekly income.

So, as an example, if you earn £25,000 a year then the absolute minimum that a Band C fine will cost you is £720.

This will increase or decrease depending on what your salary is, but magistrates are instructed to cap fines at a maximum of £1,000 or £2,500 if the driver happens to be caught excessively speeding on the motorway.

As a result, anyone earning more than approximately £47,000 probably won’t have to pay more than the maximum, leading some to claim that the sentencing changes will disproportionately punish drivers on lower incomes.

Is there any wiggle room in how much I’m fined?


Yes there is, but it works both ways. A magistrate can decrease your fine due to mitigating factors, but on the other hand they can choose to increase it based on other factors.

For example, a magistrate could choose to charge a driver more than the mandatory amount if they display a history of previous driving convictions, or if they’ve been caught speeding while on bail.

On the other hand, mitigating circumstances like a clean criminal record or proof that the driver was in a genuine emergency will be taken into account, and the magistrates could choose to be much more lenient.

Magistrates could also in certain circumstances choose to reduce the fine if the defendant is seen to be cooperating with the authorities or pleading guilty to the offence.

Are fines the only punishments speeders can get?
Depending on the severity of the offence, a magistrate could also choose to discipline drivers in other ways as well as fining them. Speeding drivers could be disqualified from driving either temporarily or permanently, while they can also choose to add points to your driving licence.

However, for less severe offences drivers with clean licences can still opt to attend a speed awareness course in order to avoid penalty points.


Useful post thanks Jack. Do you know if band C fines are based on weekly 'income' or 'salary'? :whistle:

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